Great for revisions to the profile!

Great for revisions to the profile!

(Source: monsterkraken)

1,708 notes 

short drafts

making my way through short drafts, and i’m totally impressed and am already learning so much! i know what an HB-grade pencil is and how to turn a sweater into a scarf…i’d say it’s been a good day :) i will have drafts and comments back to you all on tuesday.

“The 5 Books That Inspire the Most Tattoos" (with some interesting pictures, from Publisher’s Weekly blog)
1. Slaughterhouse Five
2. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
3. Where the Wild Things Are
4. The Little Prince
5. Fight Club

The 5 Books That Inspire the Most Tattoos" (with some interesting pictures, from Publisher’s Weekly blog)

1. Slaughterhouse Five

2. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

3. Where the Wild Things Are

4. The Little Prince

5. Fight Club

2 notes 

Digital literacy means not rote learning but experimentation, process, creativity, not just technology but multimedia imagination, expression—and principles too. It means learning why we don’t have to just be consumers of technology but also active participants in its flourishing.

If this is a revolutionary announcement about reshaping textbooks and educational content, we must ask revolutionary for whom? For wealthy schools? For students who have iPads at home and parents willing to pay out of pocket for supplementary textbook materials? For publishers?
Audrey Watters on iBooks author, quoted in “Campus Reactions to Apple’s Entry Into E-Textbook Market" on the Chronicle’s website

14 notes 

Apple’s new iBooks/iTunes U: Will it help or hurt students?

Three different takes on Apple’s announcement yesterday about iBooks/iTunes U, and its plans to provide lots of textbooks through major publishers for $15. This would be such an interesting story to pursue from the educator’s or student’s perspective, since right now other folks seem to be deciding what our perspectives are/will be (teachers will like being able to make their own books, students will like cheap prices).

I love Apple products as much as the next person, but what will it mean to have textbook content that has to pass muster with Apple first? A bit Orwellian, if you ask me…

Story 1 (The Atlantic): A Brief History of Textbooks, or, Why Apple’s ‘New Textbook Experience’ Is Actually Revolutionary

Story 2 (GigaOM): Do we want textbooks to live in Apple’s walled garden?

Story 3 (Venturebeat): The dark side of Apple’s digital textbook utopia

UPDATE: I also read this article this morning on Mashable that indicates that if you charge money for a book you make in iBooks Author, Apple owns the distribution rights to that book (and will make money from it, too). The legalese states: “you may only sell or distribute such Work through Apple.”

12 notes 

I found this wonderful article on using the Smithsonian’s creative commons licensed photos to inspire create writing today. Here’s a sample of a short story created on the basis of the Cat’s Eye photo. A great idea for creative writers - of fiction and non!

I found this wonderful article on using the Smithsonian’s creative commons licensed photos to inspire create writing today. Here’s a sample of a short story created on the basis of the Cat’s Eye photo. A great idea for creative writers - of fiction and non!

using Pinterest for storyboarding

I’m still waiting for my invitation to Pinterest (I finally broke down, despite being cautioned by many not to join because it’s such a huge time-sucker), but I found this useful article about how journalists can use the site. One awesome suggestion was:

Use it as an online storyboard. If you’re doing web-based research for an upcoming story, pin useful items to a board dedicated to the topic. If you’re collaborating with another journalist, you can share pinning access by adding a contributor to your board.

I’d love to see how this might work. I’m planning to have EL235 students try it out for project 2 or 3 to see what they think, if we can all get invites in time!

(Source: Mashable)

134 notes 

So my latest obsession is Storify, a website that lets you build a story from bits and pieces of the social web - and weave those pieces with your own narrative. Though it’s a relatively new thing, I’d love to use this site somehow in EL235. However, I was so busy writing a research article and traveling over break that I didn’t have enough time to properly think it through. Any suggestions you have will be considered - I’m more than willing to modify future assignments!

To check out what a Storify looks like, a few good examples:

Twitter’s 2011: the news in tweets

East Coast Earthquake